Archive for May 14th, 2014

The Mathematical Link Between Gears in a Gear Train

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

      Last time we analyzed the angular relationship between the Force and Distance vectors in this simple gear train.   Today we’ll discover a commonality between the two gears in this train which will later enable us to develop individual torque calculations for them.

gears and torque

      From the illustration it’s clear that the driving gear is mechanically linked to the driven gear by their teeth.   Because they’re linked, force, and hence torque, is transmitted by way of the driving gear to the driven gear.   Knowing this we can develop a mathematical equation to link the driving gear Force vector F1 to the driven gear Force vector F2, then use that linking equation to develop a separate torque formula for each of the gears in the train.

      We learned in the previous blog in this series that F1 and F2 travel in opposite directions to each other along the same line of action.   As such, both of these Force vectors are situated in the same way so that they are each at an angle value ϴ with respect to their Distance vectors D1 and D2.   This fact allows us to build an equation with like terms, and that in turn allows us to use trigonometry to link the two force vectors into a single equation:

F = [F1 × sin(ϴ)] – [F2 × sin(ϴ)]

where F is called a resultant Force vector, so named because it represents the force that results when the dead, or inert, weight that’s present in the resisting force F2 cancels out some of the positive force of F1.

      Next week we’ll simplify our gear train illustration and delve into more math in order to develop separate torque computations for each gear in the train.

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