Posts Tagged ‘kinetic energy formula’

Kinetic Energy to Work, Work to Kinetic Energy

Thursday, March 24th, 2016

    Last time we watched our example ceramic coffee mug crash to a concrete floor, where its freefall kinetic energy performed the work of shattering it upon impact.   This is a scenario familiar to engineering experts like myself who are sometimes asked to reconstruct accidents and their aftermaths, otherwise known as forensic engineering.   Today we’ll take a look at what happens when the shattered mug’s pieces are freed from their formerly cozy, cohesive bond, and we’ll watch their transmutation from kinetic energy to work, and back to kinetic energy.

    As we watch our mug shatter on the floor, we notice that it breaks into different sized pieces that are broadcast in many directions around the point of impact.   Each piece has its own unique mass, m, travels at its own unique velocity, v, and has a unique and individualized amount of kinetic energy.   This is in accordance with the kinetic energy formula, shown here again:

KE = ½ × m × v2

    So where did that energy come from?

 The Scattering Pieces Have Kinetic Energy

The Scattering Pieces Have Kinetic Energy


    According to the Work-Energy Theorem, the shattered mug’s freefalling kinetic energy is transformed into the work that shatters the mug.   Once shattered, that work is transformed back into kinetic energy, the energy that fuels each piece as it skids across the floor.

    The pieces spray out from the point of the mug’s impact until they eventually come to rest nearby.   They succeed in traveling a fair distance, but eventually their kinetic energy is dissipated due to frictional force which slows and eventually stops them.

    The frictional force acting in opposition to the ceramic pieces’ travel is created when the weight of each fragment makes contact with the concrete floor’s rough surface, which creates a bumpy ride.   The larger the fragment, the more heavily it bears down on the concrete and the greater the frictional force working against it.   With this dynamic at play we see smaller, lighter fragments of broken ceramic cover a greater distance than their heavier counterparts.

    The Work-Energy Theorem holds that the kinetic energy of each piece equals the work of the frictional force acting against it to bring it to a stop.   We’ll talk more about this frictional force and its impact on the broken pieces’ distance traveled next time.

Copyright 2016 – Philip J. O’Keefe, PE

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